Dirty Devil, Four Corners Fugitives, and Quicksand

This will be a brief post, as we are preparing and packing for 10 days on the Dirty Devil starting next Monday. We may need at least 10 days to get from the put in down to Hite at this time of year. The water has been dropping  steadily for the last couple of weeks. About two weeks back it was over 100 CFS, today it is at about 7 CFS. We’ll be dragging for sure. But we view it as just another adventure. Still trying to work out our logistics as well- it can be tough with just one vehicle.  We may check in at Blondies in Hanksville about a shuttle. I have learned that we can park at Hite near the boat ramp for an extended period. The entrance fee, $15,  covers 7 days. I talked to a ranger there and was told that 10 days would be okay with them. It feels a little safer leaving the truck there for 10 days, rather than at the take out for the Colorado over on the highway. Our other option, which I have done before, is to leave the truck at the BLM office in Hanksville. That requires hitchhiking back at the end of the trip.

Fugitives Revisited
I was recently contacted by someone who is writing a book on the Four Corners Fugitives and the 1998 manhunt. If you are unfamiliar with it, we have an (unfinished) outline of the events on the Desert Explorer website. The book will be published early next year by a major publisher. Having spent so much time in the Cross Canyon area looking for signs of the fugitives myself, I am excited to read more about it after all these years. I will post more once I get the okay from the author.

Quicksand
Many of you might already be aware of the recent (November, 2011) rescue of  a NOLS student from quicksand along the Dirty Devil River. I did not know about it until Frank pointed it out recently. I did some searching online about the incident, and from the reports I read it seems that the student was trapped for 13 hours until a rescue helicopter with a crew of three arrived and got him out.  The quicksand was only up to his knees, with water to about his waist.  Other students were with him and had attempted to extricate him, but without success. They fed him and gave him warm drinks to keep him warm. No injuries were reported and everyone was fine in the end. That is about the extent of information in the reports available online.

The incident occurred along the Dirty Devil, somewhere near the mouth of Robbers Roost. I know personally of some rather deep quicksand in that area, having experienced it while floating the river a few years back. I can’t say that I have ever been as stuck as the student seemed to be, but I have had my share of quicksand experiences. It is just a part of floating, backpacking, or hiking canyons in the southwest.

Now for the good news: according to the only article I found online about quicksand, which references studies done in the Netherlands and France, you will not sink to your death nor drown in the stuff. The human body is not dense enough to sink all the way. The article goes on to say that you “should” only sink to about your waist. It also states that self-extrication is possible not by trying to pull yourself out, but by wiggling your legs around in circles, pushing the mud away, allowing water to travel down into the hole. Water is much easier to pull yourself out of than very thick, dense sediment, that is, mud. A point to file away for the next time you find yourself sinking into mud out there in the desert.

We will post a trip report upon our return from Utah. In the meantime, we will check in using our SPOT messenger every night. You can follow us on our SPOT public page. Visit the Desert Explorer website for more on floating, the dangers of desert hiking , and our adventures.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: